Hmong and General Vang Pao in the Secret War in Laos 10

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    TubHmoob
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    Hmong and General Vang Pao in the Secret War in Laos 10

    Post by TubHmoob on May 13th 2009, 3:07 am


    This is a Hmong name; the family name is Vang. Major General Vang Pao

    Born 1931 (1931)Royal Lao Army Major General Vang Pao in Northern Laos in the early 1960s
    Place of birth Xiangkhouang Province, Laos, French Indochina Allegiance French Indochina Kingdom of Laos Flag of Laos United States of America Flag of the United States Service/branch Royal Lao Army Rank Major General Commands held GCMA Laos "Secret Army"Battles/wars First Indochina War Laotian Civil War Vietnam War (Second Indochina War)

    Vang Pao (Hmong: Vaj Pov, born ca. 1931) is a former Major General in the Royal Lao Government's Royal Lao Army. He is an ethnic Hmong and a leader of the Hmong American community in the United States.

    Vang Pao was born in 1931, in Central Xiangkhuang Province, in the northeastern region of Laos. He began his early life as a farmer until Japanese forces invaded and occupied French Indochina in World War II. In his early teen years, Vang Pao launched his military career, joining the French Military to protect fellow Hmong during the Japanese invasion.

    Military career


    Last edited by TubHmoob on June 4th 2009, 7:49 am; edited 2 times in total

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    Re: Hmong and General Vang Pao in the Secret War in Laos 10

    Post by Vajhuamsibluag on May 22nd 2009, 8:18 pm


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    Re: Hmong and General Vang Pao in the Secret War in Laos 10

    Post by Guest on May 22nd 2009, 11:38 pm


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    Re: Hmong and General Vang Pao in the Secret War in Laos 10

    Post by TubHmoob on June 1st 2009, 11:56 pm


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    Operations during the Vietnam War (Second Indochina War)

    Post by TubHmoob on June 4th 2009, 7:00 am


    Pilots

    Flying for Air America was hazardous and the pay was better than for both normal civilian and military aviation. An Air America pilot could earn as much in a week as another pilot would in a month, and the pay combined with the promise of adventure attracted many pilots. But the work was dangerous; even without conflict, pilots had to deal with poorly charted mountainous terrain, few radio beacons for navigation, bad weather, and often overloaded planes.

    Helicopter pilots had to deal with high altitude flights into mountains in tropical heat, which diminished the lift the rotors could give, and it took a great deal of unorthodox flying to accomplish their missions. The conflict itself created an even more dangerous environment, and AA pilots flew missions that few military pilots would dare, coming under fire almost on a daily basis. Many AA pilots were shot down, sometimes multiple times over the course of the war.[citation needed]

    When North Vietnamese forces overran South Vietnam in 1975, Air America helicopters participated in evacuating both South Vietnamese and American civilians from Saigon. The iconic photograph depicting the final evacuation from the "U.S. Embassy" by Dutch photographer Hubert van Es was actually an Air America helicopter taking people off of the CIA station chief's apartment building.[1]


    Last edited by TubHmoob on June 4th 2009, 2:19 pm; edited 1 time in total

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    Conspiracy (crime)

    Post by TubHmoob on June 4th 2009, 7:33 am



    Alleged plot to overthrow government of Laos

    Main article: 2007 Laotian coup d'tat conspiracy allegation

    On June 4, 2007, following a lengthy federal investigation labeled "Operation Tarnished Eagle," warrants were issued by U.S. federal courts ordering the arrest of Vang Pao and nine others for allegedly plotting to overthrow the communist government of Laos, an enemy the United States government trained Vang Pao to fight some thirty years ago, in violation of the federal Neutrality Acts. Following the issuance of the warrants, an estimated 250 federal agents representing numerous U.S. federal law enforcement and other agencies conducted simultaneous raids on homes, offices and other locations throughout central and southern California, arresting Vang Pao and the other nine.[4] The federal charges allege that members of the group inspected weapons, including AK-47s, smoke grenades, and Stinger missiles, with the intent of purchasing them and smuggling them into Thailand, where they allegedly would be shipped to anti-Laotian governmental resistance movement forces inside Laos. The one non-Hmong person among the nine arrested, Harrison Jack, a 1968 West Point graduate and retired Army infantry officer, allegedly attempted to recruit Special Operations veterans to act as mercenaries in an invasion of Laos.

    On June 15, the defendants were indicted by a grand jury and an 11th man was arrested in connection with the alleged plot.[5] The defendants face possible life prison terms for violation of the U.S. Neutrality Act and various weapons charges. Vang Pao and the other Hmong were also initially denied bail by the California federal court, which cited each of them as a flight risk.

    Since the June 4 federal raid, Vang Pao's arrest has been the subject of mounting criticism. Vang Pao's fellow friends, including Hmong, Mienh, Lao, Vietnamese, and Americans individuals who knew Vang Pao protested the arrest and rallied throughout California, Minnesota, Michigan, North Carolina and Wisconsin. Several of Vang Pao's high-level U.S. supporters have criticized the California court that issued the arrest warrants, arguing that Vang Pao is a historically important American ally and valued current leader of U.S. and foreign-based Hmong. Numerous calls for Republican Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to dismiss the case have yet to be answered and are presumably under consideration by the state.[6]

    Prior to his arrest, Vang Pao was slated to have an elementary school in Madison, Wisconsin named after him,[7] a proposal that met with opposition over Alfred W. McCoy's allegations that Vang had been involved in war crimes and drug trafficking,[8] with Gary Yia Lee and other scholars strongly disputing his claims.[9][10] Vang's June 2007 arrest later led the Madison School to reopen discussion on the school's naming.[11] On June 18, 2007, the Madison Metropolitan School District Board of Education voted to drop Vang's name from the new school, in light of the federal charges against him and the previous allegations.[12]

    Release from jail
    On July 12, 2007, under significant pressure from Vang Pao's Hmong and influential American supporters, the California federal court ordered the release of the Hmong leader on a US$1.5 million bond secured by property owned by members of his family. The Hmong were joyful to hear this news; many had participated in numerous protests over several weeks in California and elsewhere, calling for Vang Pao's release from the date of his incarceration until his release under bail nearly a month later.[13]


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    Re: Hmong and General Vang Pao in the Secret War in Laos 10

    Post by vuespro on June 22nd 2009, 6:19 am

    pab zoo li tsis muaj nuj nqis li, koj hov sav li cas?

      Current date/time is November 23rd 2014, 1:35 am